LET’S ADMIT, we’ve picked up a behavior to passionately search for that secret workout or that new diet hack that will change our bodies forever to give us the results we want.

WE DO THIS.

The conclusion is, we end up spending countless hours consuming content in YouTube and blogs digesting the information hoping to come across the magic “tip” that will change the way you do things, or how you approach them.

Unfortunately, these “secrets” and “hacks” end up being unsustainable, and maybe somewhat useless.

Don’t get me wrong, some content is extremely valuable and uplifting at the same time, but there’s a dangerous avenue you can easily slip into without proper guidance tailored around your goals.

You see, there really isn’t any secret formula out there. We’re all different, and as unique as your body is, that’s how unique your formula will be.

But there’s a common denominator…

A few weeks ago, and up until that point, I would usually work out by myself. I’d spend a few minutes the night before watching a few videos on the muscle group I’d plan to attack the next day, not that I was winging my workout plan (), but I’d just want to switch up the workout but still hit the muscle group outlined in the plan.

As a beginner, my level of a “successful” workout wasn’t really calibrated with anybody else with more experience than me. So I felt very good about my progress, and I would consistently toot my own horn on how hard I was pushing myself during workouts.

Day in and day out, I felt like if I sustain this level of work, I would see the progress in weeks! And of course, I was wrong. I joined someone else’s workout from start to finish, and I learned what pushing limits finally meant.

I won’t mention the routine or the workout format, but instead the mindset.

During the session, I noticed the energy and focus on my partner’s face and his body language was consistent down the second, almost as if he were focusing on his heart beat. He obviously had more experience and years in the game, and that’s exactly why I decided to accept the invite – to learn and grow. Resting periods were disciplined and no extra seconds were wasted on huffs and puffs or phone time – heck, I even forgot I had my phone on me.

He was very proactive, which exposed his determination to really get to that “next level”. I observed him as he scanned the gym already 2-3 workouts ahead. He explained these future workouts as if we were seconds away from doing them!

Every action he took seemed calculated, from stretching throughout the whole workout, to drinking water after each session. I admired how his mind and body connection could be so amplified (btw was not not a big dude, a lot smaller than me actually).

I was already burned out half way through the workout and I had no idea how I would finish. I was already thinking of different ways to tell this guy that: “I can’t no more, I’m done for the day” – but I wholeheartedly did not want to let him down, but he knew I was struggling. What kept me going is that I knew he was struggling too – he was pushing himself just as hard as I was.

I got to a point where I didn’t know where I was getting my strength from when finishing up reps, and I was focused more on the mindset of breaking my own records and pushing myself beyond what I thought I could. Athletes go through this, not normal people.

This day changed my approach on everything: how I eat, how I train, and how I manage my personal routines. With the old mindset of how I was doing things, thinking I would see results in weeks, I most likely would of let myself down since realistically it would of been years. I modified all my workouts based on the observations and learnings I took from this day. I had to match the intensity and the “mamba” mindset.

This catapulted my progress. I was content to know that there was no secret, it’s hard work and pushing yourself in every single workout regardless of your strategy. There’s a very high chance that you could be working harder (and smarter).

As a beginner, we need to calibrate with others, and calibrate often.